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Contributing Articles

 

ISSN: 2053-4272

Issue 35 Call for Contributors

Development Education and the Economic Paradigm

 

ABOUT THE THEME

Centre for Global Education is inviting contributions to Issue 35 (Autumn 2022) of our bi-annual, peer reviewed, open access journal Policy and Practice: A Development Education Review on the theme: “Development Education and the Economic Paradigm”.  One of the dominant narratives of international development over the past 40 years has been the economic polarization of rich and poor based on income and wealth.  According to the World Inequality Report 2022, ‘between 1995 and 2021, the top 1% captured 38% of the global increment in wealth, while the bottom 50% captured a frightening 2%’.  When global wealth accumulation is expanded to the richest richest 10% of the global population, it finds they own 76% of all wealth.  These shocking indicators of global inequality are not the product of idle speculation but based on data collected by 100 researchers located on all continents over four years.  They point to the economic paradigm that has driven development since the 1980s being propelled by growth without social purpose that is both unsustainable and accelerating inequality.

The gulf between rich and poor revealed by the World Inequality Report has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic which has preyed upon existing inequalities to deepen the poverty of the most vulnerable, particularly women and girls and racialized groups.  A poverty and wealth report published in January 2022 by Oxfam shows that ‘the wealth of the world’s 10 richest men has doubled since the pandemic began’ while the incomes of 99% of humanity are worse off.  The report finds that ‘252 men have more wealth than all 1 billion women and girls in Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean, combined’.  Perhaps the most shocking statistic in the report is that 21,300 people die from every day from inequality, that’s one person every four seconds.

The data from the World Inequality Report suggests that the wealth capture by the world’s elite is not an aberration but a trend that has accompanied the dominance of the neoliberal economic paradigm since the 1980s.  As Oxfam puts it:

“That people in poverty, women and girls, and racialized groups are so often disproportionately killed or harmed, more than those who are rich and privileged, is not an accidental error in today’s dominant form of capitalism, but a core part of it.” 

So, the aim of this issue of Policy and Practice is to debate the economic paradigm driving global inequality and also explore the possibilities of alternatives.  How can we sustain a social economy within the climatic boundaries established by scientists for protecting the natural environment?  As Oxfam suggests, we need the courage and imagination ‘to break free from the failed, narrow straitjacket of extreme neoliberalism’.   The development education sector with its global North-South ethos and investigative methodology rooted in critical consciousness is well positioned to probe the question of the economic paradigm and how we harness economic wealth as a public good rather than fuelling already distorted wealth and income inequalities.  What can we learn from the global South on how to live in a way that is community-centric, ecologically-balanced and culturally-sensitive?  As an educational methodology rooted in the global South, development education can bring some light to this discussion.

Contributors to Issue 35 could consider, through empirical work or theoretical discussion, the following: 

  • The challenges and opportunities arising from broadening the discourse on economic paradigms within development education and related sectors.
  • Reflections on how development education can support economic literacy that unveils the workings of the economic paradigm. 
  • The historical antecedents of economic injustice and inequalities between the global North and South.
  • An exploration of economic paradigms that offer manifestos for equitable, sustainable and culturally inclusive alternatives to neoliberalism such as Degrowth and the Green New Deal.  How can development education amplify and engage with these new paradigms?
  • Feminist movements and perspectives challenging neoliberalism, extractivism and patriarchal capitalism.
  • Exploring how the economic paradigm can be successfully introduced into development education policy and advocacy strategies.
  • Debating the connection between the climate emergency, inequality and the economic paradigm.

Authors interested in submitting an article to Issue 35 should send a 300-word abstract to journal editor, Stephen McCloskey, by Friday, 8 April 2022.  Please email: stephen@centreforglobaleducation.com.  The submission date for commissioned articles is Friday, 8 July 2022.    

Article Types

There are four kinds of article published in Policy and Practice

  • Focus articles are peer reviewed, between 3,500 and 6,000 words, and should have a strong critical and theoretical analysis of their topic. 
  • Perspectives articles which are 2,000 – 4,000 words in length and more descriptive, addressing an aspect of development education practice. 
  • Viewpoint articles which are 2,000 – 4,000 words in length and opinion pieces on burning issues related to DE policy and practice. 
  • Review articles are 1,000-2,000 words in length and offer an opinion of a new book, film, teaching resource or online site on development issues.

Policy and Practice is on Facebook

Please ‘like’ the journal on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/policyandpractice. We will post new articles and journal updates on the Facebook page. 

Policy and Practice is funded by Irish Aid.


Contact details for the journal

For further information on the journal contact:
Stephen McCloskey,
Centre for Global Education,
9 University Street, Belfast BT7 1FY
Email: stephen@centreforglobaleducation.com
Tel: (0044) 2890 241879
 
January 2022